Recipes

Tips to make Friendsgiving dishes ahead, transport with ease and reheat when ready – ABC News

Summary

As Thanksgiving fast approaches group chats across the country have likely been buzzing with notifications, recipe ideas, Ina Garten memes and the host’s address for the fifth time all in the name of Friendsgiving.

The food- and drink-filled festivities amongst close friends are a great way to enjoy quality time ahead of the hustle and bustle of the holiday season around a full table of delicious dishes.

While every Friendsgiving feast looks beautifully different, there are a few …….

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As Thanksgiving fast approaches group chats across the country have likely been buzzing with notifications, recipe ideas, Ina Garten memes and the host’s address for the fifth time all in the name of Friendsgiving.

The food- and drink-filled festivities amongst close friends are a great way to enjoy quality time ahead of the hustle and bustle of the holiday season around a full table of delicious dishes.

While every Friendsgiving feast looks beautifully different, there are a few universal tips and tricks to keep in mind when it comes to planning what foods to bring that can and should be prepped ahead of time, transport with ease and reheated upon arrival to ensure a hassle-free evening.

Top Friendsgiving tips

Pick a recipe that you can make at least a day or two in advance so that you’re not stressed about timing on the day of. Think casseroles, stews, stuffing, mashed potatoes and roasted veggies, these are all great options to cook ahead and store in the fridge until the event.

Eric Kim, the New York Times Cooking resident Friendsgiving expert and writer, shared a sentiment he learned from his mother, “Don’t cook when you’re stressed.”

“I strongly believe that when the cooking is less stressful, the food comes out better,” he explained. “So to minimize the mental, physical and emotional strain ordinarily caused by Thanksgiving cookery, I always encourage people to make as much of the meal as they can the night before, and to focus on the turkey and heating already assembled casseroles and side dishes on Turkey Day.”

He continued, “There are few things, especially in the pantheon of Thanksgiving foods, that need to be cooked à la minute. A cheesy casserole will be just fine the next day. You can assemble most things up to the moment the recipe says “Bake for 30 (or whatever) minutes.” Make the dish up to that point, cover it with foil, and store in the refrigerator until the next day. Finish it in the oven while the roast turkey is out on the counter resting.”

Talk to the host and plan ahead for what items will need the use of their stovetop or oven. If everyone else is bringing a dish that will need to go in the oven, maybe that’s a cue to stick with a charcuterie board, salad or dessert.

Don’t sleep on soups and stews. This is great for a group and can be simmered in a slow cooker or stovetop and served as a warm appetizer to kick off the meal while people are arriving, mingling and putting final touches on their dishes.

Use a cooking vessel that is easy to transport and can be served straight from the container. If you have something like a salad that needs to be tossed upon arriving, keep the dressing in a separate container.

Pack some Tupperware or large reusable zip top bags …….

Source: https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Food/friendsgiving-tips-recipes-make-ahead-transport-serve-ease/story?id=81178609