Recipes

Recipes for Kids – The New York Times

Summary

I don’t know about you, but predicting my children’s culinary tastes from day to day is a nearly impossible task that often ends in tears. (Mine or theirs.) Those granola bars they loved last week that I bought in bulk? They hate them now. The same goes for the Bolognese I made several batches of and then froze for quick weeknight dinners I thought they’d happily gobble up. Joke’s on me. “It’s repulsive,” said my 9-year old, as she scraped the sauce f…….

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I don’t know about you, but predicting my children’s culinary tastes from day to day is a nearly impossible task that often ends in tears. (Mine or theirs.) Those granola bars they loved last week that I bought in bulk? They hate them now. The same goes for the Bolognese I made several batches of and then froze for quick weeknight dinners I thought they’d happily gobble up. Joke’s on me. “It’s repulsive,” said my 9-year old, as she scraped the sauce from the noodles and ate — you guessed it — just the noodles.

This list of dishes includes some that my daughters have eaten and loved, others that I plan to make. So in sharing it to you, I do so with a hopeful heart but no guarantees that your kids will truly love them. (Or maybe they will — at least today, if not tomorrow.) They are easy, adaptable, delicious recipes with just-exciting-enough flavors. Many of them also have an interesting history or inspiration, so there’s something fun to learn here, too. If you have the time, cook these recipes with your kids, because they’re more likely to at least taste a dish if they help prepare it — even if they don’t actually eat it — and that’s a step in the right direction.

It’s a marvel of a dish, this mac and cheese from Ali Slagle, and it comes together in about 25 minutes and all in one happy pot. Everyone gets along: the noodles and broccoli cook together in the milk, the starch thickens the milk and the pasta absorbs the seasonings.

That smart fellow Eric Kim looked to California Pizza Kitchen’s now-discontinued Greek pizza for inspiration when he created this lovely mash-up of two perennial kid favorites: quesadillas and pizza. Sprinkle tortillas with a little mozzarella and oregano, broil until crisp, then top with a cold and crunchy Greekish salad, as Eric does here, or honestly, with whatever you like. Eric calls for drizzling the finished dish with a little honey, a popular pizza dipping sauce in South Korea, to really bring everything together.

Recipe: Tortizzas

This clever recipe from Hetty McKinnon was inspired by Cantonese chow mein, in which crunchy and soft noodles come together in a single hard-to-stop-eating meal. Soak instant ramen noodles in a little hot water until soft, toss on a sheet pan with hoisin-marinated tofu and bok choy (or broccoli), then bake until the noodle edges are crisp.

Potato chips in an omelet?! Absolutely. Alexa Weibel adapted this three-ingredient recipe from “The Family Meal: Home Cooking With Ferran Adrià” (Phaidon, 2011). Mr. Adrià was the chef at El Bulli, the now-closed Michelin-starred restaurant, but this dish, reminiscent of a Spanish tortilla, could …….

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/article/recipes-for-kids.html